McCain demands military help on U.S. border

Border marker at the San Ysidro border crossing.
Border marker at the San Ysidro border crossing.

Things must be getting worse in Arizona for Senator John McCain to finally cry foul. Maybe he’s feeling the absence of illegal immigrant warrior former Governor Jan Brewer? The Washington Examiner reports:

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain is demanding the Department of Homeland Security request military help to combat drug trafficking and illegal immigration on the Mexican border.

In a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, McCain, R-Ariz., called on him to immediately request Department of Defense support “so we can take full advantage of the department’s air assets to secure the border and combat illicit drug trafficking.”

McCain said Army drones are flying along the Mexican border, but none of the training missions are coordinated with DHS to help detect drug smuggling.

Read the full story and see Senator McCain’s letter to Secretary Johnson at The Washington Examiner.

Photo credit US Customs and Border Patrol

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