You just paid $300k to study “engineering culture” impediments to LGBTQ students

College, Classroom, NY University
College, Classroom, NY University

Is “engineering culture” really the impediment preventing LGBTQ students from pursuing a career in engineering? Or is it just that LGBTQ students on the whole simply aren’t interested in pursuing a career in engineering? We may soon find out!

The National Science Foundation is granting $300,000 in taxpayer funds to study “engineering culture” in attempt to identify the impediments (if there actually are any) to LGBTQ students. The grant further states:

“this project will build a network of LGBTQ-affirming faculty who are aware of strategies to foster an inclusive environment and are empowered to advance LGBTQ equality in their departments”

We already have anti-discrimination laws and policies in place pretty much everywhere. Call me confused, but I really don’t see what anyone’s sexual preferences have to do with engineering. Feel free to explain it to me in the comments below.

H/T CampusReform

Photo credit hackNY

 

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Tammy Messina
Christ following, wife, mother, grandmother, and small business owner with passions for holistic wellness, gardening, raising critters, and preserving our Constitutional liberties especially free speech, religious freedom, and the 2nd Amendment. God gave me the most wonderful husband, who I love dearly and am grateful to have the opportunity to work with every day as his Producer in this Real Side venture. When you see my posts, they are truly mine. So please don't hold him accountable for what I write. Contrary to what some say, I'm not a Stepford wife. I have my own opinions and am willing to share some of them here.

 

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