Sparring Millennials: Entitlement vs. Work Ethic

Grown Ups Sign
Grown Ups Sign

Millennial Talia Jane penned a letter of complaint about her employment situation and employer and publicly posted it for the entire internet universe to see. Not surprisingly, she wrote a quick follow-up:

I have been officially let go from the company. This was entirely unplanned (but I guess not completely unexpected?) but any help until I find new employment would be extremely appreciated. My PayPal is paypal.me/taliajane, my Venmo is taliajane (no hyphen). Square Cash is cash.me/$TaliaJane. Thank you so much for helping my story be heard.

Attitude is everything. Talia clearly has PLENTY of attitude! And is genuinely shocked that the company let her go after her blistering rebuke of them. Her fallback position is to ask for handouts from complete strangers, because something bad happened to her (not that she had anything to do with it, right?)

The next day, another millennial, Stephanie Williams, penned a response to Talia Jane’s whiny, entitled diatribe. Here’s a quick excerpt of Stephanie’s response.

The issue is that this girl doesn’t think working a second job or getting roommates should be something she has to do in order to get ahead after three months of an entry level job in the most expensive city in the country. She believes Yelp should cover the cost of the financial decisions she’s made which include living alone and accepting that salary, two options that any sane person would never make. She believes she deserves these things that most of us would call luxuries. You expected to get what you thought you deserved rather than expected to work for what you had to earn. And that’s the problem entirely.

Work ethic is not something that develops from entitlement. Quite the opposite, in fact. It develops when you realize there are a million other people who could perform your job and you are lucky to have one. It comes from sucking up the bad aspects and focusing on the good and above all it comes from humility. It comes from modesty. And those are two things, based on your article, that you clearly do not possess.

I highly recommend you read the full letter. Better yet, read BOTH letters with your children and teach them the importance of a strong work ethic. It’s what’s made this nation great and what’s made individuals successful in life.

Well said, Stephanie!

 Photo credit Kris Krug