Wisconsin Union rights at all costs?

The teachers/unions who want the Wisconsin legislation to do the right thing might want to “take the log out of their own eye first”.
is anyone OK with this ?

The protesters are screaming for the Government to do the right thing. They show us how to do the right thing by:

Calling in sick from their jobs.. While being seen on TV.  GOOD MOVE!
Bringing kids from school to participate in the lie…  Way to teach!
Allowing Doctors to write notes that help them perpetuate the lie, NOT COOL….
Breaking in and damaging public property to get your point across.. So it’s OK to do damage to further your cause

According to the “Atlantic” :

“Holy mackerel! It’s much worse than it looked in the paper. I’m stunned, absolutely stunned.” Dr. Derse is the Director of Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities a the Medical College of Wisconsin. “When all’s said and done, it’s really the profession of medicine that has the black eye in this case,” he says.

There is no question these doctors are masking political opinion in the white coat of the medical profession, Dr. Derse believes. “The videos are pretty damning.”

It’s sad, but what puzzles me most is how in the world three of the four physicians I can identify from these videos and other media reports are faculty members of UW’s Family Medicine department, and one is a senior resident in that same department. It’s a good training program, committed to providing sorely-needed primary care doctors to the state of Wisconsin. It teaches professionalism, and its faculty are supposed to model integrity. What were they thinking?

They’ve managed to belittle a public trust between physicians, employers and patients. A doctor’s sick note is a serious document. It represents an employer’s desire to verify through a respected, independent, medically qualified third party the fact of an illness and the true need for convalescence. In the videos now circulating online, we witness multiple members of a noted family medicine department trash one of the well-recognized rights and privileges of their profession, with little forethought as to the consequences.

UW’s doctors have demeaned not only the doctor-patient relationship, but in so doing, risked the stature doctors hold in our discourse on public policy. When commenting on social issues, physicians trade on the honor of our profession, benefiting from the public’s assumption that the wisdom won of caring for so many at their most vulnerable imbues us with some privileged understanding of collective need.

In one of the videos and a newspaper account, Associate Professor Lou Sanner says he’s giving out sick notes for “stress” (not a medical diagnosis). He claims he’s forming doctor-patient relationships in his slapdash street encounters with apparently healthy protesters. Besides his work in bioethics, Dr. Derse is an emergency physician, regularly tasked with determining fitness for work. He’s offended by Dr. Sanner’s thin claims. “I couldn’t imagine just walking up to people with a stack of work excuses, ‘What’s your name? Here you go.’ … It reflects poorly on the practice of medicine, and it reflects poorly on physicians who actually do take the time and effort try to determine whether someone is ill and is legitimately away from work,” he adds.

These doctors sacrificed a slice of the medical profession’s credibility for a political cause. Was it worth it? The fallout is mounting.

And “Outside the Beltway” says :

The Wisconsin doctors who signed fraudulent sick notes to cover striking state employees may be in trouble.

Wisconsin officials are investigating complaints about doctors who handed out medical excuses for pro-labor
protesters at the Capitol.   Dave Ross, of the state Department of Regulation and Licensing, said the agency is
looking into accusations that a number of local doctors provided the notes for protesters who missed work during
the week. Ross said the department will review complaints with the independent Medical Examining Board as soon
as possible. Tuesday’s statement came a day after University of Wisconsin Health, which employed some of the
physicians involved, said it was also looking into the matter.  Physician Lou Sanner was one of the doctors who provided
notes. He told The Associated Press on Saturday that doctors wrote the notes for what they saw as legitimate health issues
arising from stress.  I can’t imagine the “stress” argument is going to fly, given that it’s transparently bogus. The bottom
 line is that these doctors violated the trust that’s been bestowed on them and should suffer the consequences.

 

What happened to the Hippocratic oath, or maybe hypocritical oath.